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There are more than 2.5 million uncounted ballots left from Tuesday’s statewide primary

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Welcome to a special California primary edition of Essential Politics.

  • Secretary of State Alex Padilla reported on Friday afternoon that some 2.4 million votes remain uncounted from the statewide primary.
  • A state lawmaker wants to open up California’s presidential primaries to all voters.
  • After four years, voters and candidates are still getting used to the state’s top-two primary system.
  • Kamala Harris has nabbed first place and Loretta Sanchez second place in California’s U.S. Senate primary, according to AP. The two Democrats will face off in a November runoff .

L.A. officials sort uncounted ballots from the Los Angeles primary election in 2015. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
L.A. officials sort uncounted ballots from the Los Angeles primary election in 2015. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

More than 2.5 million ballots were left uncounted on election day across California, a process that could take several days or longer and leave close races in limbo.

Secretary of State Alex Padilla posted a report late Thursday on unprocessed ballots. Most of that total — about 1.8 million — were mailed to voters but returned only on Tuesday.

Six million ballots have already been counted from the statewide primary. The uncounted tally would push total voter turnout to about 8.5 million, or around 47% of all registered voters.

Los Angeles County had more unprocessed ballots than anywhere, about 616,000. San Diego County reported 285,000 uncounted ballots.

A portion of the unprocessed total are provisional ballots — designated for voters whose registration status can’t be immediately verified on election day. If a provisional ballot is later found to have been cast mistakenly, it may not be counted.


As the week ends, 2.4 million uncounted ballots from California’s primary

 (Al Behrman / Associated Press)
(Al Behrman / Associated Press)

For the politically curious, it’s the best guessing game around: What’s in the uncounted ballots from election day, and how many of them will change closely watched races across the state?

On Friday afternoon, Secretary of State Alex Padilla reported that there were 2,423,607 uncounted ballots statewide. About two-thirds of those are vote-by-mail ballots, with three Southern California counties leading the way: Los Angeles, San Diego and Orange.

Reports from a number of the state’s 58 counties haven’t changed for a few days, so expect the figures to shift pretty noticeably by early next week.

And one other part of the process: This is the first year in which ballots that arrive up to three days late — Friday would be the deadline — can be counted. So the number of ballots on hand could also change.


Voters and candidates still acclimating to state’s top-two primary system

Jesus and Adriana Mata cast their ballots in the California primary election at a polling place inside the El Gallo restaurant in El Mercado de Los Angeles in Boyle Heights. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Jesus and Adriana Mata cast their ballots in the California primary election at a polling place inside the El Gallo restaurant in El Mercado de Los Angeles in Boyle Heights. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

For voters who spent decades – even lifetimes – trying to understand the rules for elections in California, the last four years of a new system have been a jarring jumble of candidates and choices.

The seismic shock responsible: an overhaul of the rules for congressional and legislative primaries. That change, promised as a way to reform state politics, tore down election rules that had been built by political parties to give a leg up to their preferred candidates.

What’s left is a system that’s far from settled, for either voters or candidates.

“It has no doubt upped the uncertainty factor,” said Dave Gilliard, a Republican political consultant who managed several legislative races across California on Tuesday’s ballot.

As many as two dozen races for the Legislature or Congress will pit same-party candidates against each other on Nov. 8, according to early returns from Tuesday. In most of those contests, it was outside money and the number of candidates on the primary ballot — not political strategy — that shaped the outcome.


Lawmaker wants to open presidential primary ballots to all voters

Johnny Lucero, 3, plays underneath a polling box while his mother, Nicanora Contreras, casts her vote Tuesday at San Francisco City Hall. (Jessica Christian/The San Francisco Examiner via AP)
Johnny Lucero, 3, plays underneath a polling box while his mother, Nicanora Contreras, casts her vote Tuesday at San Francisco City Hall.(Jessica Christian/The San Francisco Examiner via AP)

With voters registered as no party preference locked out of voting in this week’s closed Republican presidential primary, one lawmaker proposed Thursday to open future votes to everyone.

Assemblyman Adam Gray (D-Merced) and the Independent Voter Project announced the proposed amendment to the state Constitution that would create a single presidential ballot from which all Californians could pick and choose candidates from any party.

However, the proposal would leave it up to the political parties to decide whether to count votes from no-party-preference voters or those of other parties.

“When voters fill out their ballot they expect to be able to vote for their candidate of choice, regardless of political party,” Gray said in a statement. “While voters have that right in every other state and federal election, their choices are artificially limited when voting for president of the United States.”

In addition to being locked out of the Republican presidential primary, no-party-preference voters also had to ask poll workers for ballots containing Democratic presidential candidates and those of other parties. Gray said that is unfair given that elections are paid for by taxpayers.

“If political parties want to write the rules, then they should pay for the primary elections themselves instead of asking taxpayers to foot the bill,” Gray said.

Republican Party officials were not immediately available to comment on the proposal, which would have to be approved by the state’s voters.


2,300 votes separate GOP rivals in Central Coast congressional district — with 27,000 to count

All eyes are on the No. 2 spot.

Santa Barbara County Supervisor Salud Carbajal won the primary with a commanding lead of 33% of the vote in a crowded field of nine candidates to replace retiring Rep. Lois Capps in the 24th Congressional District.

Just 2,357 votes separate Republicans Justin Fareed, a 28-year-old former Capitol Hill staffer who works for his family’s sports medical devices company, and state Assemblyman K.H. “Katcho” Achadjian of San Luis Obispo. Fareed is ahead.

There are 27,866 ballots still waiting to be processed in San Luis Obispo County alone, according to officials there. Santa Barbara County is still counting unprocessed ballots and should have an update by Friday morning.

“It’s still a tight race,” said Nyri Achadjian, the assemblyman’s daughter and campaign manager. “There are several thousand votes to be counted and we’re looking forward to seeing them come through.”

Fareed’s campaign did not respond to a request for comment.


Labor icon Dolores Huerta’s son locked in tight race for general election spot in the Central Valley

Election day is over, but the wait has just begun for Daniel Parra and Emilio Huerta, two Democrats running for Congress who are currently separated by just 467 votes.

They each hope to advance to the general election and take on Rep. David Valadao (R-Hanford), who already clinched his November spot, in a district Democrats have been struggling to crack for two election cycles.

Democrats have a 16-percentage-point advantage over Republicans in the Central Valley’s 21st Congressional District, but Valadao has steamrolled his last two opponents.

Huerta, an attorney and the son of labor icon Dolores Huerta, was supported by many in the state’s Democratic establishment and boasted a 2-1 fundraising advantage over Parra, a Fowler city councilman.

At the party’s convention in February, he even managed to successfully block Parra from getting the party’s endorsement through some dramatic maneuvers off the floor.

But it is Huerta who is lagging behind Parra with thousands of ballots in the district yet to be counted. It is unclear who will come out ahead.

“I’m a first-time candidate so everything is a surprise to me,” Huerta told The Times on Wednesday. “We were hoping, of course, to have better numbers.”

Parra said he was happy with his showing so far, especially considering what he was up against. One of the speakers who advocated for blocking Parra from getting the party endorsement was Rep. Zoe Lofgren, chair of California’s Democratic congressional delegation.

“The guy had money and he had the DCCC over working for him,” Parra told The Times. “So I’m feeling pretty damn good to have done what I’ve done. I’ve had the machine come at me and I’m still here.”

Kern County expected to have an estimate of total uncounted ballots by Thursday afternoon. About 40,000 mail-in ballots and 15,000 provisional ballots still need to be tallied in Fresno County, where about a third of the district falls.


L.A. County estimates there are more than 500,000 ballots left to count

LA County Registrar says 1.4 million ballots have been counted so far, and estimates more than 570,000 more will be counted in coming days.

Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder and County Clerk Dean Logan estimates that the county has more than 500,000 ballots left to tally from Tuesday’s primary election. More than 1.4 million ballots have been tallied in the county so far, he said in a news release.

The estimate of uncounted ballots includes 240,063 provisional ballots, 125,280 vote-by-mail ballots dropped off at polling sites and 204,946 ballots that were postmarked by election day.

The rise of voting by mail among Californians means it can often take weeks to get final election results, especially in close races such as the handful of congressional and legislative races that are still too close to call.

County election officials have until July 5 to submit their final results for presidential delegates to the office of California Secretary of State Alex Padilla, and until July 8 to submit results for all other offices. Padilla then has until July 15 to certify the state’s primary election results.


Super PAC focused on GOP voters to back U.S. Senate candidate Loretta Sanchez

Sanchez (Hayne Palmour IV / San Diego Union-Tribune)
Sanchez (Hayne Palmour IV / San Diego Union-Tribune)

A Republican political consultant on Wednesday said he is working with a super PAC to support Orange County Congresswoman Loretta Sanchez’s campaign against state Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris in November.

The Democrats were the two Senate candidates who finished in the top two in Tuesday’s primary election and will face off in the general election.

Sacramento consultant Dave Gilliard said the pro-Sanchez campaign by the Jobs Opportunity and Freedom PAC will be focused on Republican voters because no GOP candidate will be on the November ballot.

“Representative Sanchez’s experience on national issues, especially those related to national security, veterans and public safety, make her the easy choice in November,” Gilliard said in a statement.


Kamala Harris says she’s the U.S. Senate candidate who can unify Californians

U.S. Senate candidate Kamala Harris, center, and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf chat with diners at the Home of Chicken and Waffles. (Phil Willon / Los Angeles Times)
U.S. Senate candidate Kamala Harris, center, and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf chat with diners at the Home of Chicken and Waffles. (Phil Willon / Los Angeles Times)

A day after dominating the U.S. Senate primary election, state Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris hobnobbed with diners at Oakland’s Home of Chicken and Waffles and then told reporters that Tuesday’s results showed she was the candidate who can unify all of California.

According to preliminary results, Harris finished with 40.4% of the vote Tuesday, compared with 18.6% for her Democratic rival, Rep. Loretta Sanchez of Orange. Harris bested Sanchez in all but four counties, and the two were neck-and-neck in the congresswoman’s home county.

The two Democrats will face off in the November general election. Harris dismissed speculation that Sanchez may appeal to moderates and Republicans in hopes of building a patchwork of support that could lead to victory in the general election.

“California spoke last night in terms of the primary,” Harris said.  “People of every demographic, every geographic location in our state, all came together. It was not North versus South; it was not the coast versus inland. All Californians spoke. And we unified them .… That that’s how were going to go into November.”

Harris promised to debate Sanchez, but declined to say how many times, and sidestepped questions about the differences between them.

“I like getting things done. That’s the work I did as attorney general of California,” Harris said. “And that’s the work on want to do going forward.


It’s deja vu all over again with these November runoffs

As was expected, California voters in several races will be choosing between some familiar names in the general election.

Here are the competitive races in which incumbents will square off against the same opponent they faced in 2014:

In the Legislature:

  • Assembly District 36: Assemblyman Tom Lackey (R-Palmdale) will again face Steve Fox, a Democrat who won this seat in 2012 and whom Lackey ousted in 2014. This will be the third cycle in which these two rivals meet: In 2012, Fox edged out Lackey in the primary before winning against another Republican in November. Democrats have a voter registration edge in this seat and could make it one of their pickup priorities for the fall.
  • Assembly District 39: Assemblywoman Patty Lopez (D-San Fernando) may be an incumbent, but she hasn’t shed much of her outsider status since her surprise win in 2014. Primary results show her nearly 20 points behind former Assemblyman and fellow Democrat Raul Bocanegra, whom Lopez has defeated by less than 700 votes.
  • Assembly District 53: In the 2014 primary, Assemblyman Miguel Santiago ran against three other Democrats for this open seat and still walked away with 56% of the vote. This time, he faced only two others and got just 47%. He’s now in a rematch against activist Sandra Mendoza, who lost to him by wide margins in the last general election.
  • Assembly District 65: In Tuesday’s primary, Democratic challenger Sharon Quirk-Silva, who won this seat in 2012 only to lose it in 2014, pulled ahead of Assemblywoman Young Kim (R-Fullerton) in this true swing district. With 100% of precincts reporting, Quirk-Silva was up by more than 3,000 votes.

  • Assembly District 66: Al Muratsuchi is another Democratic challenger who’s ahead of a Republican incumbent after Tuesday’s results. He and Republican Assemblyman David Hadley (R-Manhattan Beach) will face off in November in one of the more hotly contested races with an eye toward the Democrats’ supermajority.

In congressional races:

  • Congressional District 10: Rep. Jeff Denham (R-Turlock) will again face Democrat Michael Eggman, who lost to Denham in 2014. With voter registration virtually tied, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee has placed this on its “Red-to-Blue” priority list.

  • Congressional District 17: Repeat challenger Ro Khanna appears to be ahead of Rep. Mike Honda (D-San Jose), a stark contrast from the 2014 primary, when Khanna trailed Honda by 20 points. Khanna has been building up momentum toward what is sure to be a lively rematch of the last election.
  • Congressional District 31: Rep. Pete Aguilar (D-Redlands) will again face Iraq war veteran Paul Chabot, who ran against Aguilar for this open seat in 2014. Aguilar beat Chabot by three percentage points in the 2014 general election, and while Democrats maintain a slight edge in voter registration here, it could be a competitive race for the first-term congressman this fall.

source:http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-pol-ca-california-primary-there-are-more-than-2-5-million-1465520381-htmlstory.html

KING: A true Bernie Sanders supporter could never vote for Donald Trump

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Dear Bernie supporters,Today kind of sucks, right?

The media, the President, and the Democratic Party have pretty much moved on from what we helped Bernie build over this past year. What we make it moving forward is in our hands. I think we have some pretty amazing options, actually.

I have so many things to say to you about how our movement is so much bigger than this election, but today I have to make one clear point:

If you love Bernie Sanders, if you voted for Bernie or ever donated to his campaign, if you respect Bernie, who he is and what he stands for, you can never vote for Donald Trump.

Every few days Donald writes a tweet or makes a comment about how he believes some of Bernie’s supporters are going to come on board and vote for him.

Bernie Sanders delivers a statement after his meeting with President Obama at the White House on June 9, 2016.

Bernie Sanders delivers a statement after his meeting with President Obama at the White House on June 9, 2016.

(GARY CAMERON/REUTERS)

Donald Trump is a lying scam artist. He’s a con man. Bernie is an honest, trustworthy man of integrity.

Donald Trump is a filthy rich billionaire who lives in excess. Bernie is a humble man and one of the poorest members the Senate.

Donald Trump is a bigot whose words and policy ideas put real people in harm’s way. Bernie has fought for civil and human rights his entire life.

Donald Trump is the 1% that Bernie has fought against his entire life.

Listen, if you are anything like me, you are a countercultural type. You go against the grain. You are frustrated with our entire government. I get it. I do.

Donald Trump speaks at Trump National Golf Club Westchester in New York.

Donald Trump speaks at Trump National Golf Club Westchester in New York.

(KENA BETANCUR/AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

And you may see Hillary Clinton as a part of the establishment. I agree with you, but Donald Trump must never be your alternative to Hillary Clinton.

Listen — who you vote for is your business. I’m not telling you to vote for Hillary. I don’t even think I could bring myself to do that.

What I am saying, and I want to be loud and clear, is this: Donald Trump is the enemy to everything good Bernie stands for. Period. If you support Donald Trump, you are standing against what Bernie Sanders has championed.

Bernie himself has said this repeatedly.

Joy Behar tweets sexually tinged message to Bernie Sanders

Just yesterday Bernie said, “The American people will never support a candidate whose major theme is bigotry. We will not allow Donald Trump to become President.”

Front page of the New York Daily News for June 9, 2016.

Front page of the New York Daily News for June 9, 2016.

(NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)

Do not allow your judgment to be clouded. Do not allow yourself to be duped by Donald. Do not allow your frustration with Hillary Clinton and the Democratic establishment push you to a strange place where you would ever consider pushing the button or pulling the lever for Donald.

That’s all I actually know at this point. I just can’t see myself voting for Hillary. My views on money in politics, war, the death penalty, the environment and so much more stand in strong opposition to her. It’s not just a stylistic difference for me — it’s principled.

But one thing is clear to me right now — I will never vote for Donald Trump. Ever.

I’d rather have Kanye or Kermit the Frog than that man.

source:http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/king-true-sanders-supporter-vote-trump-article-1.2667719?utm_content=buffer0cb35&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=NYDailyNewsTw

‪#‎ThankYouBernie‬

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Bernie Sanders at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, New York.

 ‪#‎ThankYouBernie‬ shirt => https://teechip.com/thankyoubernie

These past eight months have been the most exciting of my life. I have made hundreds of new friends, have learned so much about the issues that affect our nation, and was even given the opportunity to introduce Senator Bernie Sanders in front of thousands of enthusiastic people. But most importantly, I was able to see how politics can be changed from the ground up where our elected officials can be authentically secure in leading from within and being able to speak the truth.

When I first decided to support Senator Sanders back in October, I had no expectations of being on the winning side come the convention in July. Rather, I was drawn by my instincts to back the candidate who best spoke to my issues.  Little did I know that this movement that we have been a part of would go on to capture the minds and hearts of millions across the country. But now that the primary contests are almost over, what is important is that we recognize that the progressive fight for our vision of America is still alive and well.

While Hillary Clinton has won the battle of votes in this primary, we have won the battle of ideas. These ideas do not vanish upon the conclusion of an election cycle, instead they have been rooted for committed activists to take on and carry with them. So yes, I have had my share of disagreements with the former Secretary. However, elections do indeed have consequences – both the primary election that is nearing an end, and the general election that is just ahead.

The presumptive nominees for president of the two major parties are now Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.  I always have, and always will be on the side of keeping Trump out of the White House. With that, I am very eager to participate in Philadelphia at the Democratic National Convention in July as a delegate for our party. My role in shaping future issues of justice is only beginning.

We all need to thank Bernie Sanders for his decades long service to our country as well as his timely contributions to this primary. Let’s give him some space and allow him to wrap up this primary as we get ready for the convention. The reality is that we need to keep him in a leadership role that puts the needs of young people and working people at the forefront. Our country is better off with his voice.

In solidarity,

‪#‎ThankYouBernie‬ shirt => https://teechip.com/thankyoubernie

source: http://m.dailykos.com/story/2016/6/8/1536212/-Thank-You-Bernie

Bernie Sanders Wins California Landslide BUT 2/3 of his Votes Aren’t Counted (VIDEO)

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FIGHTS ON

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June 7, 2016.  California.  The Justice Gazette reporters and others are conducting an investigation into voting irregularities and the theft of Bernie Sanders’s apparent California landslide victory by those supporting Hillary Clinton.  According to popular actress Frances Fisher, a lawsuit is being prepared to require the counting of all the provisional ballots.  If this lawsuit is successful, the actual vote count is expected to become known and Sanders will likely have a landslide victory in California.

The theft of California hasn’t deterred Sanders from his course.  He has promised to fight on while noting it is a steep uphill climb.   Given all the states where vote fraud in favor of Hillary Clinton has been allowed to swing primaries from Sanders to Clinton, it is in fact a steep uphill climb to restore democracy and force the now undemocratic Democratic Party to nominate the man the vast majority of American voters  have voted for or tried to vote for.


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It has been learned from poll workers that 50% to 90% of voters who were supposed to have been eligible to vote in the Democratic primary were told they would have to vote provisional ballots.    There were two irregularities leading to the forced use of provisional ballots instead of regular ballots.  The first was that previously registered voters’ names had been removed from the rolls.  The second was that someone (in most cases, not the voter) had marked them as vote by mail voters but they had received no ballot in the mail.   Oddly, virtually all of those not allowed to vote and forced to vote provisional ballots were Bernie Sanders supporters.

The next oddity is even more curious.  Poll workers in Los Angeles and Orange County report that Bernie won the electronic votes in their precincts by well over a 2 to 1 margin, the opposite of the result of the vote count.  The contrast between this and the outcome is indicative of vote-flipping.  Also the outcome.. outcome does not match what anyone who has conducted polling in this state knows:  Below the election night video is a video about black box voting (Hacking Democracy) ,   The Democratic Party has essentially endorsed this video, showing it at various conventions and another video of a computer programmer confessing to creating a vote-flipping program.


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If you add the lower figure of 50% of voters who were not allowed to vote regular ballots for Bernie to the votes he received, you wind up with a substantial Sanders landslide victory in California.  The primary beneficiary of the fraud is Hillary Clinton.  

As for provisional ballots, acclaimed BBC reporter, author and election fraud expert Greg Palast (pictured to the right) calls them “placebo ballots.”    Greg is the reporter who exposed the voter fraud in Florida in 2000.  Nightline used his footage in covering the story.  Here is from Greg’s article, How California is being stolen from Sanders right now.”

“As I’ve previously reported, provisional ballots are “placebo” ballots that let you feel like you’ve voted, but you haven’t. Provisional ballots are generally discarded.”


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 The Justice Gazette has conducted considerable polling and the official results reflect the opposite of how people said they were going to vote.  At the California Democratic Convention most of the elected delegates were “Bernie or Bust.”  Ask yourself, when Sanders gets enthusiastic crowds of thousands in California (sixty thousand according to police in Oakland alone) compared to laid- back crowds of hundreds for Clinton, who voted for Clinton?   Ask your neighbors, co-workers and fellow students if they voted for her and  then start asking how she supposedly won the election without the support of the voters. Or just look at Alameda County (Berkeley, Oakland), where Sanders was greeted by a hundred thousand active supporters, where Clinton is very unpopular and where Clinton’s percentage and Sanders percentage appear to be the exact reversal of what the residents of that county know to be the case.  If you walked into any store or group setting, other than a Clinton gathering, and asked who was going to vote for Clinton, you would find that nobody or maybe one or two people would be considering voting for her.   Almost all the rest would be planning to vote for Bernie  Sanders.   We know.  At the Justice Gazette, reporters did just that.

Poll workers in Orange and Los Angeles County have reported that Bernie won the electronic votes in their precincts by well over a 2 to 1 margin.  So how does this translate into a victory for Clinton?  Ask yourself why an excited crowd of thousands came to the election night event of a loser when this kind of crowd has never come to the event of a primary loser in California’s history.    Perhaps this is because Sanders didn’t lose.  Votes can be flipped in less than a minute by someone walking into the Registrars office.  Watch Bev Harris’s documentary Hacking Democracy and the  video of a confession on the creator of a program designed to do just that below.


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 Prior to going into the California primary, it was known that Sanders was going to insist that the Democratic National Convention nominate the winner of the California primary.  Clinton is very unpopular in California and it would have been impossible for her to acquire the votes to win legitimately.  There was only one way for Clinton to win and that was to rig the election.  Those running the Democratic Party have made it clear, following the known rigging of elections in other states, that they either consider election fraud and rigging a proper way to win a nomination or don’t care if a candidate wins this way.

Back to forcing the majority of Sanders voters to vote uncounted provisional ballots. You may ask, how Hillary knew who to disenfranchise?  There are multiple ways. First, new voters were overwhelmingly planning to vote for Bernie. Second, of the NPP (no party preference) voters, the vast majority were Sanders supporters.  But it may also be the Sanders campaign that owes the voters an apology for letting Clinton know which voters to disenfranchise.

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Last December the relationship between NGP Van and Clinton and that Van’s apparent willingness to engage in unethical conduct on behalf of the Clinton campaign was widely exposed.  Yet, the primary applications the Sanders campaign uses for canvassing were obtained from NGP Van.  One of the main application programs the Sanders campaign used for canvassing  is called Minivan.   It is well known that many many, if not most, manufacturers leave a backdoor allowing them to re-access programs.

In Arizona, Sanders poll workers were told on the last day before the election that it was known that their MiniVan program had been hacked and that on that pre-election day, people would be using paper canvassing sheets.  This was just for the last minute stuff.  Almost all the canvassing had been done already in Arizona.  What did the Sanders volunteers tell MiniVan (and possibly the Clinton campaign) about the voters they canvassed or called?  They marked if the person was: “Strong Sanders,” “Leaning Sanders,” “Strong Clinton,””Leaning Clinton,” or “Undecided,” among other things.  If you were Clinton and you wanted to disenfranchise millions of voters, wouldn’t it be nice to know who is supporting your opponent?  For the record, reporters for the Justice Gazette did bring their concerns about MiniVan to the attention of the Sanders campaign following Arizona.  However, the campaign went back to using this in state after state.


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While the public is mostly loyal to Sanders, some question the loyalty of some of his staffers.  Canvassers were given wildly inaccurate precinct phone and walking lists that left off most of the voters who were planning to support Sanders. Canvassers were supposed to skip about 20 or more houses for every one they hit.  Usually the one selected had the wrong occupant while the new occupants of the selected houses as well as people who were supposed to be passed over in the other 20, often said they were registered and planning to vote for Bernie to canvassers who chose to speak to them anyway.  It was pointed out to the campaign that it would have been easier and more productive to go door to door to all the houses than to search around for the one inaccurate address on a street a mile from the last address.  

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 Another key alert as to possible infiltrators was the odd treatment of the press.  While  Correct the Record and reporters/hackers from other organizations and media groups promoting Clinton were treated like royalty, members of the press who had gone on record supporting Sanders were often treated with contempt by certain members of the team  running logistics at the rallies.   Correct the Record  (the PAC paying a million dollars to hackers who put child pornography on Sanders facebook pages and then got them closed down) was given the best filming location in San Pedro after that same prime filming location had been denied to news teams favorable to Sanders.  On election night,  several reporters favorable to Sanders commented on how rudely they were being treated.  Reginald Hubbard and Jesse Cornett who reportedly threatened some of the mild-mannered, more loyal press with loss of equipment, removal or confiscation of their press credentials (which they had brought with them) and removal of the actual reporters from the event in response to polite questions about the sound arrangements.  Most of the pro-Sanders reporters were placed on a riser near distorted speakers and denied access to the event’s sound boxes they had been promised and which were provided for other media.  One reporter, a very sweet woman, who had been traveling on a bus following the candidate, seemed to disappear from the event after she reported that she had been rudely treated by these same staff people  prior to the speech.

The fix was in before the primary.  An instructional video for poll workers told them to give provisional ballots to NPP voters, official conduct that would have been illegal in California. AP joined in the effort to try to fix the election by calling the nomination for Clinton the night before the election when AP knew or should have known that Clinton did not have enough pledged delegates and would not have enough on June 7th to be the nominee.  This appears to have been part of the overall attempt to suppress the vote.  As Sanders has repeatedly pointed out, 

“If there is a large turnout we will win.  If there is a very large turnout we will win huge.  If there is a low turnout, we will lose.”

In spite of AP’s false call, the actual turnout was very large and, but for the suppression, the evidence supports the theory that Sanders would have won by a very wide margin.

Overall, it was a tough night for Sanders supporters.  The average American is not about to support Hillary Clinton.  Nobody at the election night event believed there was any accuracy in the results.   Despite the officials results (which left off half or more of the voters), the Sanders supporters were optimistic as they knew in their hearts that Sanders had won California.  With the election rigging  and theft so obvious, the  bulk of the public does not believe that Clinton is a legitimate nominee.  The bulk of the Democratic voters will never accept Clinton or vote for her in the general election.  Some are calling the theft of the nomination a “coup d’ etat,” “treason” and “sedition” on Clinton’s part.

As for the voters who weren’t allowed to vote, the buck stop with two people: California Secretary of State and Clinton supporter Alex Padilla  and Hillary Clinton, herself, the candidate who benefited from the voter suppression.  Almost everyone in American knows  or is related to one of Clinton’s victims.  Clinton’s apparent crimes are against the American people and this matters more than whether a clown is running as a nominee the other party.  America has survived racist clown Presidents in the past but is not about to endure a President who has committed crimes that have destroyed the right to vote of people they know.

The crowd at the Sanders rally is not going to give up.  In fact they are energized and angry and most of them have as their top goal, defeating Hillary Clinton in all elections. If Bernie were to endorse her, his supporters would be saddened and many would feel betrayed, but the Sanders voters have made it clear that they will not follow Bernie to Clinton.

In view of the information from polling place workers about Sanders winning by more than a 2 to 1 margin and in view of the removal of 2/3 or more of his votes from the official results, the Justice Gazette declares Bernie Sanders the landslide winner of the 2016 California Primary Election.


source:http://justicegazette.org/bernie-defrauded-in-ca.html

Robert Reich’s Open Letter to Bernie Sanders Is Going Viral

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Robert Reich — Bill Clinton’s former Secretary of Labor — is one of Bernie Sanders’ biggest supporters. His recent open letter thanking Sanders for his game-changing campaign is going viral.

Reich congratulated the Vermont senator for rising from a fringe candidacy with zero name recognition from a far-flung corner of the country to becoming an international political phenomenon who seriously challenged the entrenched corporate establishment while refusing to sell out to big money.

“You have helped shape the next generation,” Reich wrote. “You’ve done it without SuperPACs or big money from corporations, Wall Street, and billionaires. You did it with small contributions from millions of us. You’ve shown it can be done without selling your soul or compromising your conviction.”

Reich, a college professor who is also known for his activism around the issue of income inequality, thanked Sanders for running a fierce campaign around the most serious issues of our time — and for being the only candidate to seriously talk about poverty, Wall Street greed, and campaign finance reform.

“Your message – about the necessity of single-payer healthcare, free tuition at public universities, a $15 minimum wage, busting up the biggest Wall Street banks, taxing the financial speculation, expanding Social Security, imposing a tax on carbon, and getting big money out of politics – will shape the progressive agenda from here on,” Reich wrote.

Reich ended his letter with a promise to continue Sanders’ fight for a political revolution beyond the Democratic National Convention and into the next election cycles.

“We will not succumb to cynicism. We are in it for the long haul. We will never give up,” Reich wrote.

During an energetic speech last night in Santa Monica, California, Sanders vowed to continue fighting for every vote in next week’s primary in Washington, D.C., and all the way to the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Read the full text of Reich’s letter below:

The only thing I can think of doing this morning is to write a public note to my friend, Bernie Sanders:
Dear Bernie:

I don’t know what you’re going to do from here on, and I’m not going to advise you. You’ve earned the right to figure out the next steps for your campaign and the movement you have launched.

But let me tell you this: You’ve already succeeded.

At the start they labeled you a “fringe” candidate – a 74-year-old, political Independent, Jewish, self-described democratic socialist, who stood zero chance against the Democratic political establishment, the mainstream media, and the moneyed interests.

Then you won 22 states.

And in almost every state – even in those you lost — you won vast majorities of voters under 30, including a majority of young women and Latinos. And most voters under 45.

You have helped shape the next generation.

You’ve done it without SuperPACs or big money from corporations, Wall Street, and billionaires. You did it with small contributions from millions of us. You’ve shown it can be done without selling your soul or compromising your conviction.

You’ve also inspired millions of us to get involved in politics — and to fight the most important and basic of all fights on which all else depends: to reclaim our economy and democracy from the moneyed interests.

Your message – about the necessity of single-payer healthcare, free tuition at public universities, a $15 minimum wage, busting up the biggest Wall Street banks, taxing the financial speculation, expanding Social Security, imposing a tax on carbon, and getting big money out of politics – will shape the progressive agenda from here on.

Your courage in taking on the political establishment has emboldened millions of us to stand up and demand our voices be heard.

Regardless of what you decide to do now, you have ignited a movement that will fight onward. We will fight to put more progressives into the House and Senate. We will fight at the state level. We will organize for the 2020 presidential election.

We will not succumb to cynicism. We are in it for the long haul. We will never give up.

Thank you, Bernie.

source:http://usuncut.com/politics/robert-reich-thanks-bernie-sanders/

‘The Struggle Continues’: Sanders Refuses to Bend the Knee to Establishment

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‘We will take our fight for social, economic, racial, and environmental justice to Philadelphia,’ senator declares
'The Struggle Continues': Sanders Refuses to Bend the Knee to Establishment

Senator Bernie Sanders arrives at his campaign rally in Santa Monica. (Photo: Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

By Jon Queally / commondreams.orgBernie Sanders refused to concede the race for the Democratic Party presidential nomination on Tuesday night even as he congratulated his rival Hillary Clinton on her primary wins and thanked his supporters for their determined commitment to the ‘political revolution’ he has championed throughout the hotly contested primary season.

“If this campaign has taught us anything,” he told an enthusiastic and cheering crowd in Santa Monica, California just after 10:30 pm local time, “it has proven that millions of Americans who love this country are prepared to stand up and fight to make this country a much better place.”

When Sanders took the stage, and as of this writing, major news outlets had awarded three of the day’s six contests–New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota–to Clinton, while Sanders was able to claim victories in both Montana and North Dakota.

Results in California, meanwhile, remained too close to call.

Though roundly criticized as an inaccurate assessment of the delegate math, media outlets referred to Clinton as the “presumptive nominee of the Democratic Party” throughout the evening. During a prime time speech from Brooklyn, New York, Clinton celebrated the “historic” night after being the first female candidate of either major party to earn the distinction.

In his speech, though it appeared at first Sanders might submit to the not-so-subtle urgings of the Democratic Party establishment and many political pundits who said it was now time for him to quit the race, the U.S. senator from Vermont defied those sentiments by saying his campaign would forge ahead towards next Tuesday’s final primary contest in Washington, D.C..

When he said the “fight would continue,” the crowd erupted with a roar of approval.

“We are going to fight hard to win the primary in Washington, D.C.,” he continued. “And then we will take our fight for social, economic, racial, and environmental justice to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.”

While Sanders acknowledged the difficult “arithmetic” for his campaign on Tuesday night—calling the fight ahead “a very, very steep fight”—he stuck to his repeated promise that he was ready to take “the movement” and energy of his campaign all the way to July’s national convention.

“Thank you all,” he told the roaring crowd, before concluding: “The struggle continues.”

Watch the full speech:

‘We will take our fight for social, economic, racial, and environmental justice to Philadelphia,’ senator declares
'The Struggle Continues': Sanders Refuses to Bend the Knee to Establishment

Senator Bernie Sanders arrives at his campaign rally in Santa Monica. (Photo: Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

By Jon Queally / commondreams.org

Bernie Sanders refused to concede the race for the Democratic Party presidential nomination on Tuesday night even as he congratulated his rival Hillary Clinton on her primary wins and thanked his supporters for their determined commitment to the ‘political revolution’ he has championed throughout the hotly contested primary season.

“If this campaign has taught us anything,” he told an enthusiastic and cheering crowd in Santa Monica, California just after 10:30 pm local time, “it has proven that millions of Americans who love this country are prepared to stand up and fight to make this country a much better place.”

When Sanders took the stage, and as of this writing, major news outlets had awarded three of the day’s six contests–New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota–to Clinton, while Sanders was able to claim victories in both Montana and North Dakota.

Results in California, meanwhile, remained too close to call.

Though roundly criticized as an inaccurate assessment of the delegate math, media outlets referred to Clinton as the “presumptive nominee of the Democratic Party” throughout the evening. During a prime time speech from Brooklyn, New York, Clinton celebrated the “historic” night after being the first female candidate of either major party to earn the distinction.

In his speech, though it appeared at first Sanders might submit to the not-so-subtle urgings of the Democratic Party establishment and many political pundits who said it was now time for him to quit the race, the U.S. senator from Vermont defied those sentiments by saying his campaign would forge ahead towards next Tuesday’s final primary contest in Washington, D.C..

When he said the “fight would continue,” the crowd erupted with a roar of approval.

“We are going to fight hard to win the primary in Washington, D.C.,” he continued. “And then we will take our fight for social, economic, racial, and environmental justice to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.”

While Sanders acknowledged the difficult “arithmetic” for his campaign on Tuesday night—calling the fight ahead “a very, very steep fight”—he stuck to his repeated promise that he was ready to take “the movement” and energy of his campaign all the way to July’s national convention.

“Thank you all,” he told the roaring crowd, before concluding: “The struggle continues.”

Watch the full speech:

source:http://www.filmsforaction.org/articles/the-struggle-continues-sanders-refuses-to-bend-the-knee-to-establishment/

Bernie Sanders’ supporters are uniting with the hashtag #ThankYouBernie

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Bernie Sanders Smile

Presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders vowed on Tuesday night to continue his campaign, even as his rival, Hillary Clinton, claimed the Democratic presidential nomination.

In a speech that The New York Times notes “felt much like a valedictory,” the Vermont senator told his supporters he would continue his campaign to the final primary, in the District of Columbia, on June 14.

“You all know that it is more than Bernie — it is all of us together,” Sanders said.

 

Faced with delegate math that looks nearly impossible to overcome, Sanders campaign may soon be over. The White House said on Tuesday that Sanders will meet this week with President Barack Obama, who has already signaled that he is ready to begin campaigning for Clinton.

The Times also reported that Sanders is preparing to lay off about half of his campaign staff on Wednesday.

Sanders’ supporters shared their love for the candidate on Tuesday night, using the hashtag #ThankYouBernie.

source:http://www.businessinsider.com/bernie-sanders-supporters-use-hashtag-thankyoubernie-2016-6

HRC Is Not the Nominee

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Superdelegates don’t vote until July; but the media can try to influence the election every damned day of the week.
HRC Is Not the Nominee

Go, Bernie, Go

By  filmsforaction.org

The Associated Press ran the story yesterday that Clinton had enough delegates and superdelegates to clinch the nomination, ignoring the DNC’s own instruction not to include superdelegates in the count; and the simple reality that superdelegates cannot vote until the convention in July. They published it on the eve of the California primary; and, in the great tradition of “protesting too much”, they said that ‘Nothing in that discourages or prevents voters in six states from exercising their right to go to the polls today and cast their ballots.”

They know exactly what they’re doing.

Of course it will discourage people from voting.

Here’s the truth:

Hillary Clinton is not the Democratic nominee.

The convention will be contested. That is a fact.

We won’t have a nominee until July.

The Democratic party needs Sanders supporters to win; but beyond that simple reality, they need Sanders supporters to exist.

People under 45 overwhelmingly support Sanders. They have also been paying attention to how the entire process has unfolded, how the media have manipulated it, and how the DNC has skewed it. There is nothing to be proud of, nothing to inspire loyalty. This latest, while egregious, is just another log on the fire.

Hillary Clinton can talk all she wants about what unites us; but the reality is, right now, I simply can’t bring myself to consider voting for her or Drumpf. I suppose that can change; but if you put me in a voting booth right now and told me “Clinton, Trump, or shit-burrito”, I’d be reaching for salsa.

The Democratic Party underestimates the potency of these feelings at their peril. You can’t dismiss, marginalize, disenfranchise, and slander people and then expect them to come out and help you a few months later. Sanders supporters know what’s up; we’ve been following things closely. You may be able to fool people about us, but you can’t fool us.

#wakeupDNC

Bernie Sanders Slams Media’s ‘Rush’ to Declare Victory for Clinton

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Neither Democratic candidate has achieved the required 2,383 delegates needed to clinch the nomination, but the Associated Press still declared victory for Hillary Clinton over Bernie Sanders for the Democratic nomination today.

BREAKING: @AP finds Clinton reached the number of delegates needed to clinch the Democratic nomination for president

In response, the Bernie Sanders campaign has scolded the media for celebrating before anything had actually been decided.

“It is unfortunate that the media, in a rush to judgement, are ignoring the Democratic National Committee’s clear statement that it is wrong to count the votes of superdelegates before they actually vote at the convention this summer,” Sanders spokesman Michael Briggs said.

Media outlets like Washington Post and The Hill were quick to put out articles anointing Clinton as “the first woman in history to win a major party nomination.”

Clinton has so far gotten the public support of 571 of the Democratic insiders known as superdelegates compared to Bernie’s 48. However, superdelegate votes are not officially cast or counted until the Democratic National Convention, which runs July 25-28. Bernie is planning to flip the support of some of these superdelegates before then, citing the data which suggests he defeats Donald Trump in a general election match-up by much larger margins than Clinton.

Without the superdelegates, Clinton currently has 1,812 to Sanders’ 1,521 pledged delegates.

Michael Briggs reiterated the Sanders campaign’s plan. “Our job from now until the convention is to convince those superdelegates that Bernie is by far the strongest candidate against Donald Trump.”

Even the Clinton campaign has declined to follow the media’s lead, tweeting “We’re flattered, @AP, but we’ve got primaries to win. CA, MT, NM, ND, NJ, SD, vote tomorrow!”

Read the full statement from the Bernie Sanders campaign here.

source:http://usuncut.com/news/bernie-sanders-media-clinton-ca/

How 107 Superdelegates Robbed 11 Million Democratic Voters

33

The Associated Press (AP) has prematurely called the Democratic primary for Hillary Clinton, despite some 11 million Democrats still waiting to vote in six states and one territory, based off the opinion of superdelegates who have yet to vote.

The dominant media narrative is that Sanders is asking superdelegates to thwart the will of the public in order to win the Democratic nomination. But the AP came to their conclusion by a phone survey of the 712 superdelegates, meaning Clinton was declared the winner due to private conversations between reporters and a relatively small handful of Democratic party bosses who won’t actually vote for a nominee until the end of July.

Clinton’s nomination depends on superdelegates defying their state’s voters
FiveThirtyEight’s Nate Silver criticized Sanders’ strategy of courting superdelegates at the convention, saying “[Sanders] can win only if a huge number of superdelegates who have committed to Clinton flip their vote against her, despite her having won a clear majority of votes and elected delegates, thereby overturning the popular will.”

Last week, the Washington Post’s Glenn Kessler mocked Sanders’ battle to the finish as a “false hope,” insinuating that the Vermont senator’s Hail Mary pass to superdelegates is undemocratic by nature:

Sanders claims it would be “factually incorrect” for the media to declare Clinton the presumptive nominee once she crosses the 2,383 threshold. But he is ignoring the fact that Clinton will also win a majority of the pledged delegates. There’s not much of a case he can make to superdelegates to switch sides, especially since he has long insisted that superdelegates should follow the will of the voters.

Fusion’s Terrell Jermaine Starr pointed out that Obama was only able to persuade superdelegates backing Clinton to switch after he started racking up more primary wins than the former First Lady, and that Sen. Sanders is going against the wishes of Democratic voters by continuing his campaign for the Democratic nomination:

It’s a big stretch to believe that superdelegates will overrule the will of the people, who have overwhelmingly voted for the former New York senator… At one point during the 2008 primaries, prominent black politicians were backing Clinton. But after Obama began winning most of the black vote (especially black women) during the primaries, they were pressured to recommit to Obama. Rep. John Lewis was among the first to switch his allegiance. Why? Because the people said so. It would have been odd for Lewis to vote for Clinton, even though his constituents backed Obama. But that is what Sanders is asking superdelegates to do: overrule the people.

All of these arguments are right in that Bernie Sanders will need to rely on superdelegates to switch from Clinton’s side to his in order to become the Democratic nominee. But all three authors neglected to report that Hillary Clinton reached 2,383 delegates only with the help of 107 superdelegates from states Bernie Sanders won, who actively thwarted the will of millions of Democratic voters in their own states.

In Utah, where Sanders won by a 79-20 margin, two of the state’s four superdelegates are backing Clinton.
11 of 16 superdelegates in Minnesota are supporting Clinton, even though Sanders won the state’s March 1 caucus by a 62-38 margin.
While Sanders blew Clinton out of the water by a 73-27 margin in Washington State, Clinton has 10 of 16 superdelegates. Sanders has zero.
Six of Wisconsin’s ten superdelegates are supporting Clinton, while only one is backing Sanders. The Vermont senator won the Badger State’s primary by 14 points.
All nine superdelegates in Rhode Island have committed to supporting Hillary Clinton, even though Bernie Sanders defeated the former Secretary of State by a 12-point margin.
Sanders also has only one superdelegate in Alaska, same as Clinton, even after winning the state by an 82-18 margin. One Alaska superdelegate backing Clinton patronized and belittled a Sanders supporter who asked her to cast her superdelegate vote with how her state’s residents voted.
Comparatively, only 14 of Sanders’ 49 superdelegates have come from states Hillary Clinton won. Two of those superdelegates came from Arizona, where the US Department of Justice is conducting an official investigation due to widespread complaints of election fraud and voter suppression.

11 million Democrats still haven’t voted
It’s important to note that in 2008, media networks didn’t call the nomination for Barack Obama until after every state and territory had voted. On June 3, after Obama won the final two primaries in Montana and South Dakota, media networks declared him the presumptive nominee, after having enough pledged delegates and unpledged superdelegates to cross the threshold of 2,118 total delegates necessary to clinch the nomination. 241 of Obama’s 478 superdelegates came from the 21 states and 2 territories Hillary Clinton won.

 

2008demprimary

2008demprimary
Map of 2008 Democratic primary wins for each candidate. Purple denotes an Obama win, gold denotes a Clinton win.

This year, the key difference is that the AP declared Clinton the presumptive nominee on June 6, a full day before six more states voted. This effectively discourages nearly 11 million registered Democrats from voting (7.43 million in California, 1.79 million in New Jersey, 1.29 million in New Mexico, approximately 320,000 in Washington, DC).

To accept the AP’s declaration of Clinton’s victory as undisputed fact, it would have to be assumed that zero superdelegates will change their minds before the convention. This is highly unlikely, as 99 superdelegates changed their minds in 2008 (98 flipped from Clinton to Obama, one flipped from Obama to Clinton).

However, perhaps the most important detail the AP overlooked when crowning Clinton as the nominee was that this year, Luis Miranda, the Democratic National Committee’s own communications director explicitly told CNN’s Jake Tapper that it’s incorrect for the media to count superdelegates before they vote in July:

LUIS MIRANDA: “On superdelegates, one of the problems is the way the media reports it. Any night you have a primary or a caucus, the media lumps in superdelegates that they basically polled, because they call them up and say, ‘Who are you supporting?’ They don’t actually vote until the convention, so they shouldn’t be included in any count on a primary or caucus night, because the only thing you’re picking on primary or caucus nights are the pledged delegates based on the vote.”
JAKE TAPPER: “When we do our totals, do you think it’s okay to include them?”

LUIS MIRANDA: “Not yet, because they’re not actually voting, and they’re likely to change their minds. You look at 2008, and what happened then was there was all this assumption about what superdelegates were going to do, and many of them did change their mind before the convention, and it shifted the results in the end.”

Clinton could have lost every state and still won the nomination with superdelegates
In addition to the media’s preemptive declaration of a Clinton win, the superdelegate system itself begs the question of whether or not Bernie Sanders was ever given a fair chance at winning the nomination.

In August of 2015, for example, Bloomberg reported that Hillary Clinton had secured the commitments of some 440 superdelegates — or 61.7 percent of all total superdelegates — nearly six months before New Hampshire voters had a chance to cast a ballot in the nation’s first primary. This is inherently undemocratic, as Bloomberg also pointed out that Clinton had such a huge early advantage with party insiders that she could win the nomination outright without even winning a single state:

It’s technically possible for Clinton to win the nomination by dominating the superdelegate count even if she (narrowly) loses every state: Thanks to strict proportional allocation on the Democratic side, a candidate only gains a small delegate advantage for a small edge in primary votes.

Despite the valid concerns Sanders supporters have about the media calling the race too early or superdelegates unfairly tipping the scales in Clinton’s favor, it would take nothing short of a miracle for Sen. Sanders overcome his opponent’s lead in delegates and overall votes and win the nomination. According to the delegate calculator on Demrace.com, Sanders would need to garner 79 percent of the vote in California and at least 50 percent of the vote in every other primary and caucus to overcome his opponent’s pledged delegate lead.

Sanders would also need the votes of more than 7 million of the 11 million registered Democrats in the six states and one territory that have yet to vote in order to have the popular vote advantage. Finally, he would need to convince the majority of Clinton’s superdelegates to change their minds and back him at the national convention. While credible journalists have reported that an undisclosed number of Clinton’s superdelegates are contemplating switching to Sanders should he win the California primary, it’s highly unlikely that would be enough to put the Vermont senator over the 2,383 delegate threshold.

Regardless of how the final primaries and caucuses turn out, Sanders has earned the right to stay in the race until the end of the national convention, and his supporters have every right to question and contribute to the party’s nominating procedures and official platform.

source:http://usuncut.com/politics/superdelegates-robbed-voters-primary/